Saturday, June 15, 2019

Father's Day Sale Prices for Autosomal DNA tests

These prices are good to 17 June 2019:


In addition FTDNA has sales on Y DNA and mtDNA tests.



Sunday, May 05, 2019

Mother's Day autosomal DNA test prices:

Mother's Day autosomal test prices:




23andme. $99. Also a $30 discount on the Health & Ancestry package.

Ancestry. $59. Offer ends May 13.

Family Tree DNA. $79.

Living DNA, $79.

MyHeritage. $69. Sales ends May 13.

Irish DNA Atlas

The Irish DNA Atlas has been published to present the results of a study on DNA in Ireland.

From Nature:

Article | OPEN | Published: 08 December 2017

The Irish DNA Atlas: Revealing Fine-Scale Population Structure and History within Ireland

Edmund Gilbert, Seamus O’Reilly, Michael Merrigan, Darren McGettigan, Anne M. Molloy, Lawrence C. Brody, Walter Bodmer, Katarzyna Hutnik, Sean Ennis, Daniel J. Lawson, James F. Wilson & Gianpiero L. Cavalleri

Scientific Reports volume 7, Article number: 17199 (2017) | Download Citation


An Author Correction to this article was published on 03 May 2018

This article has been updated



Abstract

The extent of population structure within Ireland is largely unknown, as is the impact of historical migrations. Here we illustrate fine-scale genetic structure across Ireland that follows geographic boundaries and present evidence of admixture events into Ireland. Utilising the ‘Irish DNA Atlas’, a cohort (n = 194) of Irish individuals with four generations of ancestry linked to specific regions in Ireland, in combination with 2,039 individuals from the Peoples of the British Isles dataset, we show that the Irish population can be divided in 10 distinct geographically stratified genetic clusters; seven of ‘Gaelic’ Irish ancestry, and three of shared Irish-British ancestry. In addition we observe a major genetic barrier to the north of Ireland in Ulster. Using a reference of 6,760 European individuals and two ancient Irish genomes, we demonstrate high levels of North-West French-like and West Norwegian-like ancestry within Ireland. We show that that our ‘Gaelic’ Irish clusters present homogenous levels of ancient Irish ancestries. We additionally detect admixture events that provide evidence of Norse-Viking gene flow into Ireland, and reflect the Ulster Plantations. Our work informs both on Irish history, as well as the study of Mendelian and complex disease genetics involving populations of Irish ancestry.

See the article for discussion and maps.

Also, see, People of the British Isles: preliminary analysis of genotypes and surnames in a UK-control population

April 2019 update from Living DNA

Living DNA is a DNA ancestry service from England. Originally it specialized in providing a geographic breakdown of your DNA to locations in England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. It has added Eire and is going to be adding Germany to its reports. A news update is available at this link,

https://livingdna.com/news/living-dna-april-2019-product-update




Wednesday, May 01, 2019

Genomic data and the GDPR

From the PHG Foundation:

The potential of technologies such as these, together with other digital technologies to fall outside existing regulatory frameworks has prompted radical reform of data protection law across Europe. Thus, in May 2018 the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force across the continent and in the UK, further national legislation has been implemented through the UK’s Data Protection Act 2018. This legal framework governs of the use of personal data in healthcare and research, and it explicitly recognises the category of genetic data for the first time (it will continue to apply in the UK regardless of Brexit).

However many, including Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Matt Hancock, are concerned that the rules governing the use of genetic data could hinder the legitimate use of data for healthcare and research.

http://www.phgfoundation.org/blog/how-does-the-gdpr-apply-to-genomic-data




Tuesday, January 01, 2019

Ancient nuclear genomes enable repatriation of Indigenous human remains

http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/12/eaau5064

Abstract

After European colonization, the ancestral remains of Indigenous people were often collected for scientific research or display in museum collections. For many decades, Indigenous people, including Native Americans and Aboriginal Australians, have fought for their return. However, many of these remains have no recorded provenance, making their repatriation very difficult or impossible. To determine whether DNA-based methods could resolve this important problem, we sequenced 10 nuclear genomes and 27 mitogenomes from ancient pre-European Aboriginal Australians (up to 1540 years before the present) of known provenance and compared them to 100 high-coverage contemporary Aboriginal Australian genomes, also of known provenance.

We report substantial ancient population structure showing strong genetic affinities between ancient and contemporary Aboriginal Australian individuals from the same geographic location. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of successfully identifying the origins of unprovenanced ancestral remains using genomic methods.

Article continues http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/12/eaau5064